Content about Owen Street, Manchester

September 26, 2014

The concept of a shopping center as a place where people simply show up to make a few purchases and leave is becoming passé. Increasingly, developers are building mixed-use centers that include residential, office and entertainment components, which turn them more into a consumer home base and less of a functional destination. Add in amenities like town squares, public parks, community gardens and amphitheaters, and the “shopping center” becomes more of an all-around “center” of activity.

Walk this way

August 19, 2014

The story of Houston, Texas has added some exciting new chapters in recent years. With low unemployment, a booming economy and one of the fastest-growing populations of any city in the nation, Houston’s rise alongside some of the most prominent cities in the nation continues unabated.

The story of Houston, Texas has added some exciting new chapters in recent years. With low unemployment, a booming economy and one of the fastest-growing populations of any city in the nation, Houston’s rise alongside some of the most prominent cities in the nation continues unabated. Trailing only New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago in size, Houston’s growing influence as a cultural and financial icon has made it a player on the national and international stage.

March 4, 2014

Remember 2011 and 2012? Back then, the forecasters were saying that the economy would probably be sluggish through 2013. After that, starting in 2014, growth would return.

October 3, 2013

Different developers look at mixed-use in different ways. One developer will look for trade areas that provide solid demand for retail, residential, office and perhaps other uses. The goal is to create developments where no single use dominates the others.

Still other developers gauge the demand for various uses and adjust the use offerings to match demand. In such cases, one use may dominate the center.

The Trademark approach to demand

September 21, 2012

Blending multiple components in a single development isn’t a new idea. In fact, the Urban Land Institute first turned the phrase “mixed use” some 30 years ago, defining it as three or more significant revenue-producing uses in a single project.