Content about Chinese culture

January 21, 2014

The Year of the Horse arrives January 31, 2014, the first day of the Chinese New Year, which will run through February 18, 2015.

The Year of the Horse arrives January 31, 2014, the first day of the Chinese New Year, which will run through February 18, 2015.

Beverly Center in Los Angeles plans to celebrate the Chinese New Year and promote the Year of the Horse from day one through the month of February.

The Chinese Zodiac follows cycles of 12 years, with each year named for an animal. This year is the Year of the Horse. It is said that people born in the Year of the Horse may be hardworking, independent, intelligent and fall in love easily.

January 22, 2013

Westfield San Francisco Centre is partnering with the Asian Art Museum, Bloomingdale’s and M.Y. China to celebrate the Chinese New Year with music and dance performances, storytelling, live cooking demonstrations, zodiac readings and more – all launching in January.

San Francisco -- Westfield San Francisco Centre is partnering with the Asian Art Museum, Bloomingdale’s and M.Y. China to celebrate the Chinese New Year with music and dance performances, storytelling, live cooking demonstrations, zodiac readings and more – all launching in January.

May 5, 2011

I’m not much of a follower of astrology and the signs of the zodiac, but I do know that 2011 is the Year of the Rabbit on the Chinese calendar.

I’m not much of a follower of astrology and the signs of the zodiac, but I do know that 2011 is the Year of the Rabbit on the Chinese calendar.

It seems somehow fortuitous that speed and agility define a year that is all about economic recovery. And retail is moving forward at a rate that, while not exactly hare-like, is at least faster than the proverbial tortoise.

April 19, 2011

I’m not much of a follower of astrology and the signs of the zodiac, but I do know that 2011 is the Year of the Rabbit on the Chinese calendar.

It seems somehow fortuitous that speed and agility define a year that is all about economic recovery. And retail is moving forward at a rate that, while not exactly hare-like, is at least faster than the proverbial tortoise.